Miriam (Maria) Di Pasquale / Projets / Alma and the other ...

Alma and the other ...

Women who between 1850 and 1950 were able to affirm their artistic talent. Women who have shown great strength of mind, as well as exceptional talent. Women who have managed not to take a step sideways, neither in the face of socially unfavorable conditions, nor in the presence of non-conciliatory husbands, often also great artists, who badly tolerated having a wife next to them who was not entirely devoted to their priority male art.

They are women and their activity is always relegated to a second floor. By taking on the responsibility, with a recognized sensitivity as superior, of the human drama but also of the meaning of life, they express something more profound, which disturbs contemporary society. Most of them feel intimately free and take advantage of this freedom to discover and learn, especially in a historical moment in which art in all its forms is enriched with novelties and avant-gardes.

Alma Schindler Mahler is an example above all, his is a real thirst for expression, musical, sure, but also relational, in every possible sense. It is curiosity in its purest form and exploration of various shades of the soul. Insufficient space has been historically reserved for all these incredible women, which totally ignores their value. We want to give voice to each of them, through a selection of pieces that privilege the plurality of perspectives, languages ​​and cultures, and through the creation of a path of musical and scenic suggestions.

Not therefore a simple recital, frontal, static, but a show acted, represented, animated by a dramatization, so that every piece of music, or every group of songs, can offer the public a global experience thanks also to the integration of poetic texts and literary works of great Italian authors (Alda Merini, Sibilla Aleramo, Goliarda Sapienza, Maria Montessori among others) whose language and personality naturally resonate with those of our composers. Through lights and colors, plays of shadows, auxiliary sounds, choreographies, costumes, props, details that can capture the sensitivity of the spectator and touch at least one of the many strings that make up his sensitivity. But above all, putting into play our being women, musicians, curiously projected beyond the already known, and re-enacting all this extraordinary, and at times new, material.